Tuesday, 29 March 2016

Monday, 28 March 2016

Parts of the Mouth and Their Functions

The mouth, or oral cavity, is made up of numerous components that work together so that you can breathe, speak, eat and digest food. When you understand these parts of the mouth and how they affect your general health, the significance of oral care takes on a whole new meaning. Here's what these things do for you.

Lips and Cheeks
Your lips and cheeks are made up of muscles that not only give you the ability to pucker up for a kiss, but also help shape your facial expressions - both happy and sad. Lips let air into your mouth for breathing and, together with cheeks, help you speak. They also keep food and saliva in your mouth while chewing. Ultimately, these strong muscles guide and keep your teeth in their proper positions.

To read the entire article by Donna Pleis, please visit Colgate.com

Saturday, 26 March 2016

Dental Mouthguards

Protect Your Teeth While Playing Sports

Don't become a part of the staggering statistic of tooth loss due to injury and trauma while playing sports. About 5 million teeth are knocked out each year because of no or inadequate protection for the teeth. The mouthguards purchased in stores do not fit properly or give enough protection. We recommend and can provide a custom-made mouthguard that will protect all your teeth for any sport. 

The American Dental Association recommends the use of custom mouthguards for these sports: acrobatics, basketball, boxing, field hockey, football, gymnastics, handball, ice hockey, lacrosse, martial arts, racquetball, roller hockey, rugby, shotputting, skateboarding, skiing, skydiving, soccer, squash, surfing, volleyball, water polo, weight lifting, and wrestling.


Lifetime Family Dentistry
Elena Bielawski, DDS, FICOI, FMIII
66 Maple Avenue
Collinsville, CT 06019
(860) 605-2075
LifetimeFamilyDentistryCT.com 

Tuesday, 22 March 2016

Monday, 21 March 2016

Ten Human Tongue Facts for Well-Rounded Oral Care

Think back to the days when your tongue served two main functions: licking soft-serve ice cream cones and taunting a sibling when you stuck it out in his direction. But the tongue actually goes beyond melting desserts and young attitude. Here are ten human tongue facts, including some of its functions.

The Average Tongue Is Four Inches Long
The tongue consists of two parts: anterior and posterior. The anterior tongue is mostly visible and about two thirds of the tongue's total length. The posterior tongue sits near the back of the throat and measures the other one third in length.

To read the entire article by Steve Auger, please visit Colgate.com

Saturday, 19 March 2016

Dental Crowns

Crowns Repair a Damaged Tooth

If a tooth is broken, chipped, or worn down, a filling will not restore it. A crown can be made to precision to fit over the remaining tooth structure and give you full chewing capabilities again. Our porcelain crowns are made from e.max™ high-quality materials. They resemble a natural tooth and will blend in with your other teeth. For a missing tooth, a bridge made of the same type of material is often the best option. We custom-make your bridge.

Tuesday, 15 March 2016

Saturday, 12 March 2016

Children's Dental Care

No More Nasties: Brushing for Kids!

We Care About Kids!

We look forward to seeing the youthful, happy smiles of our kids. We want them to feel relaxed and delighted to be at their dentist's office, and we provide these amenities for their enjoyment:
  • Coloring Books
  • Pillows & Blankets
  • A Special Stuffed Animal
  • Surprise Toys & Balloon Animals
  • No-Shot, No-Drill Dental Fillings

Thursday, 3 March 2016

6 Habits That Harm Your Teeth (And How to Break Them): Chewing Ice Cubes

The habit: “Tooth enamel is a crystal. Ice is a crystal. When you push two crystals against each other, one will break,” Dr. Messina says. “Most of the time it’s the ice, but sometimes the tooth or a filling will break.”

The solution: Drink chilled beverages without ice, or use a straw so you're not tempted. “The risk of chewing ice is greater than any pleasure that comes from chewing it,” he says. “Besides, ice is really cold!”

To read the entire article please visit MouthHealthy.org